Mark Driscoll on Men and being a Leader in Church

by hamiltonmj1983

A recent quote from Mark Driscoll has been widely circulating the interwebs:

“My desire as a Christian pastor is to see churches raised up as communities of grace ruled by Jesus and led by his gloriously masculine men who work their jobs, eat their meat, drink their beer, romance their wives, study their Bible, and raise their kids in glory and joy” – Mark Driscoll

Now, this quote is being posted without any context whatsoever, so I would really like to know where it is coming from. Please give me a link or a reference to a book or something if you know where this quote comes from!

Now, I am going to comment on this quote, while accepting the fact that I am not reading it within its greater context context. If you are more aware of the context than I am, please let me know. Thanks.

First off, based on the text within the quote, Driscoll is not stating what should or should not be biblically; he is stating his “desire as a Christian pastor.” This is what HE wants.

He desires to see churches raised up as communities of grace. I agree with this sentiment.

He desires to see those communities of grace ruled by Jesus. I also agree with this sentiment.

He finally desires to see those communities of grace led by “gloriously masculine men.” He then goes on to explain his version of masculinity, being that those men “work their jobs, eat their meat, drink their beer, romance their wives, study their Bible, and raise their kids in glory and joy.”

This last desire is what I take issue with. I do not have a problem with “gloriously masculine men” leading churches. I have an issue if a church ONLY allows “gloriously masculine men” to lead their churches. I think that a church has some serious theological problems if they will not allow men who do not eat meat, who do not drink beer, who do not have a job, or are not married, to be leaders. I also think that the church has a serious theological problem if it will not let women be leaders.

In the spirit of full disclosure, I am a stay-at-home-dad who teaches religion as an adjunct at the community college, and my wife is a United Methodist pastor, so my context explains my view (or does my view explain my context?).

None of the things Driscoll calls for in male leadership are wrong. It is wrong, however, to view that list as qualifications for church leadership. This quote does not come out and declare these things as qualifications for leadership, although the way it is quoted seems to imply that very fact. I do not know what Driscoll is thinking, and I do not dare judge his heart. The people who are posting this to Twitter and Facebook with no context whatsoever probably ought to be careful as to not mislead readers without giving them more context to go by.

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